Dump trucks. Sanitation crews. Social service providers. Storage bins. Police and emergency personnel.

That was the scene at the Kensington Avenue and Tulip Street heroin encampments Wednesday. Within the span of a few hours, the inhabitants of the encampments were gone; the sidewalks cleaned and sanitized.

The deadline to vacate the sidewalks under the two railroad bridges along Lehigh Avenue was 10 a.m. In the preceding months, those experiencing homelessness and substance abuse issues in Kensington, widely seen as the epicenter of the city’s heroin epidemic, have occupied one side of the streets’ sidewalks with tents and makeshift shelters.

Police cordoned off Kensington Avenue and Tulip Street with yellow police tape that morning, and social service crews and city workers offered assistance to the roughly three dozen people who remained there as the deadline approached.

The few tents, shelters and other belongings there were either packed into bins provided by the city or thrown away.

The closure of the camps was the culmination of the city’s 30-day pilot plan, a comprehensive strategy that including daily outreach and assessments at the sites, as well as the availability of treatment, housing options and social services. The plan focused on two of the four encampments due to budget constraints.

“As a system, this is as close as we have come to treatment on demand, and that is what people have been telling us that we need to have,” said Elizabeth Hersh, director of the city’s Office of Homeless Services.

Hersh spoke about the program at McPherson Square later in the day alongside Health Commissioner Thomas Farley, Michael DiBerardinis, the city’s managing director, Philadelphia Police Inspector Ray Convery, Councilman Mark Squilla and others.

The rollout of the plan is in stark contrast to how the city went about closing down the other heroin encampments last year, including the Gurney Street train gulch.

A survey found nearly 300 people in the two encampments over the past month, which resulted in a list of names of 110 people described as verifiably homeless, Hersh said.

Since the program began on April 30, more than 130 people have accessed treatment and/or emergency housing through the program, although some were not on the city’s by-name list. That exceeds the number of people who sought those services during the previous six months, Hersh said.

The city plan also made beds available for each of the 110 who were verifiably homeless. The new 40-bed Kensington Navigation Center, which the city opened in May, and an additional 40 beds made available at Prevention Point are full, Hersh said.

Beds remain available for those on the city’s by-name list; those not on the list must access assistance through the city’s homeless services, which remain strained and unable to meet the current demand.

In addition, the city expanded a low-barrier respite model, which allows people to access shelter-like facilities without identification and where they could bring their belongings. As part of the program, Prevention Point, the city’s only needle exchange, began offering daytime services.

“Once people are in, they don’t have to go back to the camps,” Hersh said. “There’s a safe, supportive place for services and basic needs to be met.”

However, there were skeptics of the plan.

“This is chaos,” said Britt Carpenter of Philly Unknown Project, a nonprofit that offers assistance and services to people experiencing homelessness and substance abuse, as he watched crews dismantle the Kensington encampment. He characterized the city’s plan as an attempt “to evict the homeless.”

Carpenter stood alongside Rosalind Pichareto of the nonprofit Operation Save Our City, and the pair were holding signs that said “Do Better” and “Eviction with No Plan.”

The encampments, Pichareto said, offered a reliable place to go for those with substance abuse issues and allowed service providers to find and access them. The city’s plan will force many out of sight, she said, which could result in more overdoses.

“Now we don’t know where they’re going,” she said. “What’s going to happen now? They’re going to be dead in between cars, living in abandoned buildings, shooting up in front of people’s homes. Here it was contained; here they could have provided services. Now they’re scattered everywhere.”

The fear of other encampments springing up was shared by Evan Figueroa Vargas, a recovery advocate.

“People are going to relocate to abandoned houses in the neighborhood,” Figueroa Vargas said while standing on Kensington Avenue. “So what happens when people use alone? They die alone, right? While [the encampment] doesn’t appear to be the best-case scenario, there was a sense of community here; there were people carrying Narcan,” which blocks the effects of opioids and can reverse an overdose.

Bright orange signs warn anyone who remains living at either encampment that they risk being issued a citation by police.

When the morning began, approximately 15 people remained in the Tulip Street encampment, and 20 at Kensington Avenue’s, Convery said. No one was arrested or issued summonses.

Squilla, whose district includes some encampments, applauded the program as a positive for both the residents living in the neighborhood and those in the encampments.

This plan, Squilla said, shows that “we as a city do care, and we’re not here to just move people off and move people out, but we’re there to get people help.”

DiBerardinis, the city’s managing director, said he expects the city to roll out similar programs in the coming fiscal year, which begins July 1, if the current budget is approved.

Overall, it would cost $7 million to $8 million to fully address homelessness citywide, a figure that continues to remain out of reach.

Police will continue to monitor the underpasses everyday, Convery said, adding: “We’re pretty confident that those two bridges will stay empty.”

Meanwhile, at the Emerald Street and Frankford Avenue encampments that morning, nothing seemed out of the ordinary.

Along Emerald Street, tents completely lined the sidewalk on one side of the road below the bridge.

Marie Thomas, 41, who has been living there for months, said there was no room for more people to live along Emerald Street. She expected the closure of the two other encampments would lead to people squatting in abandoned homes.

“It’s just going to cause more of a problem, you know? They’re just going to have the same problem, just in a different area,” Thomas said.

However, there were skeptics to the plan.

“This is chaos,” said Britt Carpenter, of Philly Unknown Project, a nonprofit that offers assistance and services to those experiencing homelessness as he watched crews dismantle the Kensington encampment. He characterized the city’s plan as an attempt “to evict the homeless.”

At the Kensington encampment, Carpenter stood alongside Rosalind Pichareto, of the nonprofit Operation Save Our City, and the pair were holding signs that read, “Do Better,” and, “Eviction with No Plan.”

The encampments, Pichareto said, offered the homeless and those struggling with addiction to have some sort of community, which also allowed service providers to access them. The city’s plan will force many out of sight, she said, which could result in more overdoses.

“Now we don’t know where they’re going,” she said. “What’s going to happen now? They’re going to be dead in between cars, living in abandoned buildings, shooting up in front of people’s homes. Here it was contained; here they could have provided services. Now they’re scattered everywhere.”

The fear of other encampments springing up was shared by Evan Figueroa Vargas, a recovery advocate who was at Kensington Avenue that morning.

“People are going to relocate to abandoned houses in the neighborhood,” Figueroa Vargas said. “So what happens when people use alone? They die alone, right? While this doesn’t appear to be the best case scenario, there was a sense of community here; there were people carrying Narcan,” which blocks the effects of opioids and can reverse an overdose.

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