CCP, administration talks continue

A week after the faculty at Community College of Philadelphia voted to go on strike, talks still were ongoing.

— TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO

A week after the faculty at Community College of Philadelphia voted to go on strike, talks still were ongoing between its union and college administrators as of Wednesday morning.

Both parties returned to the table at 11 a.m. to continue working with a mediator in the hopes of getting the issues resolved, said CCP spokeswoman Linda Wallace via email. Classes are still in session and in the event of a strike, the college said it will work hard to minimize any disruption to students.

The Faculty and Staff Federation of Community College of Philadelphia AFT Local 206 represents nearly 1,200 employees. Contract negotiations have been ongoing for the past three years with issues centering around class size, teaching loads, healthcare and pay raises.

Wallace said the union’s proposal would increase the college’s operating budget by $82.8 million over the life of the contract, or 8 years.

Philadelphia City Council President Darrell Clarke urged a fair resolution to avert a strike.

“It is imperative that students enrolled in CCP continue to receive their education without interruption, and as such I urge both sides to remain at the bargaining table in order to reach a fair contract as soon as possible,” Clarke said in a statement. “Council does not have standing as a negotiating party, but we do have an interest in the best and fairest outcome for students, faculty and taxpayers alike.”

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