Aubry Stone

Aubry Stone

SACRAMENTO — He fought tirelessly to secure economic opportunities for African Americans throughout the state and beyond and now, after a long battle with cancer, he’s at rest.

Aubry Stone, founder and CEO of the California Black Chamber of Commerce died Wednesday. He was 74.

Stone, affectionately referred to by many as “Stoney,” was a formidable champion for Black entrepreneurs and was considered to be a giant in the small business community. While he was a native of Brooklyn, New York, his name was synonymous with California and was a familiar face — and voice — at the State Capitol.

“He was a pioneer and fierce advocate for minority business enterprise and for the Black community. He championed equal opportunities in the private and public sectors, and always talked about the need for better access to capital,” shared Los Angeles City Councilmember and former Assemblymember Curren Price.

“Aubry Stone was a fierce unapologetic supporter of all things Black,” shared former California Assemblymember Cheryl Brown.

“He was our champion,” Ms. Brown continued.

Stone and five others created the California Black Chamber of Commerce in 1995 with the mission of providing programs and services to strengthen Black ownership and business opportunities throughout the state. The California Black Chamber of Commerce Foundation also operates radio station KDEE FM 97.5.

— The Sacramento Observer

Stone served on the California Regional Community Utilities Diversity Council, the Citibank Regional Community Board, the California Small Business Advisory Board, the CalTrans Small Business Board, and the Greenlining Coalition. He served on the Boards of the NAACP, the Sacramento Black Chamber of Commerce, the Mayor’s Economic Development Council, the District Attorney’s Community Relations Board, and the State Fair Minority Council.

He was also the founder and president of A. Stone & Associates, a corporate diversity-training firm designed to improve communications for increased productivity and break down stereotypes.

He also took on national leadership roles, at a time serving on the Pfizer National Minority Business Board and as Chairman of the United States Black Chamber of Commerce. He recently travelled to Africa to explore and promote business opportunities for Black business owners.

Upon his passing, many are reflecting on the legacy Stone leaves behind.

“He will be remembered as an outstanding force for economic and social justice,” shared California Hawaii State NAACP President Alice Huffman. — The Sacramento Observer

(1) comment

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So sorry for the loss of Aubry Stone. This must be a very painful period for your family. Please be assured that God is not only aware of your pain, the promise from his word shows that he will indeed act to remedy it. (Revelation 21:3, 4) In the meantime, God invites you to put trust in him for comfort and endurance this day and others to come (Isaiah 41:10, 13). Please accept my personal condolences at this most difficult time.

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